Reagan

Discussion in 'Chatter' started by IQless1, Jun 21, 2015.

  1. IQless1
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    IQless1 trump supporters are scum

    An interesting point of view:

    Reagan’s Racially-tinged Narratives

    "Reagan’s bogus tales of food stamps chiselers and welfare queens tended to employ racial imagery and often outright racist references to blacks (e.g., in telling a tale about food stamp fraud to a Southern audience, Reagan referred to a “young buck” (“buck” is a derogatory term used in the South to denote an African-American man) using his food stamps to buy T-bone steaks and to northern audiences he spoke of the apocryphal story of the “Cadillac-driving” Chicago welfare queen (Reagan's anecdotes were a wild distortion of the welfare fraud case involving a Chicago woman named Linda Taylor. These bogus stories were a double whammy: 1. They worked to break off a significant chunk of the white working class (the “Reagan Democrats”) by appealing to their worst instincts and fears; and 2. They served as a justification for Reagan’s economically regressive policies (also see the addendum)

    What made these narratives particularly toxic is that this race-baiting was justified by the argument that Reagan and his allies were trying to better the situation of racial minorities. Reagan repeated these fabrications years after they were debunked. Having been a Hollywood star, Reagan knew that stories are more powerful persuaders than facts."

    Source
     
  2. IQless1
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    IQless1 trump supporters are scum

    With apologies to the author, if this is deemed inappropriate to republish here. (see: "Source", above for the complete blog)

    Reagan’s Infamous Neshoba County Fair Speech and The Republicans’ Southern Strategy

    It was long after Reagan left office that I heard about Reagan’s infamous speech at the Neshoba County Fair, right outside Philadelphia, Mississippi where three civil rights workers—James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner--had been slain in 1964. Reagan used this historic area to send a coded message to Southern racist. Ragan (sic) told the crowd that he was in favor of “state rights” and that as president he would "restore to states and local governments the power that belongs to them." Reagan shared the stage with John Bell Williams, a notorious segregationist and then-Representative Trent Lott who applauded Strom Thurmond's 1948 Dixiecrat campaign. Reagan only came to the Neshoba County Fair after Mississippi's Republican national committeeman wrote his campaign to advise that it would be a good place to reach out to "George Wallace-inclined voters.” Reagan’s 1980 campaign manager, Lee Atwater acknowledged in 1981 that the strategy had been designed to appeal to "the racist side of the [George] Wallace voter" without antagonizing other Americans who might be offended by ugly Wallace-style racism. As Atwater explained, "You start out in 1954 by saying, 'Nigger, nigger, nigger.' By 1968 you can't say 'nigger'—that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like 'forced busing,' 'states' rights,' and all these things that you're talking about are totally economic things and a by-product of them is [that] blacks get hurt worse than whites. And subconsciously maybe that is part of it... because obviously sitting around saying, 'We want to cut this,' is much more abstract than even the busing thing and a hell of a lot more abstract than 'Nigger, nigger.'"
     
  3. IQless1
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    IQless1 trump supporters are scum

    ...and again...:rolleyes:;)

    Reagan and Racial Politics: A List

    • Racially-tinged Welfare Cadillac phony narratives that Reagan repeated even after they were thoroughly debunked.

    • The Hearst Ransom Statement. In 1974, after Patricia Hearst was kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA), the SLA demanded that the Hearst family provide groceries to poor and minority areas. When the food-ransom went to poor and minority communities, Then-Governor Reagan joked, "It's just too bad we can't have an epidemic of botulism." Before its passage, Reagan opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibited discrimination in public accommodations. This act was a cornerstone of the civil rights legislation that eliminated Jim Crow in the 1960’s.

    • Reagan denigrated the Voting Rights Act of 1965. A little background on the Act: Prior to the passing of the Act, voting by blacks in states in the deep South was less than 10 percent. This was largely because of sham literacy tests, in 1980, far from applauding the numerous injustices that the Voting Rights Act remedied, Reagan denounced it, declaring that it was “humiliating to the South.”

    • Reagan and the racist South African regime. Reagan was very slow to criticize the South African Apartheid regime. He vetoed economic sanctions against the regime (Congress overrode the veto). Reagan’s political ally, the Reverend Jerry Falwell, traveled to South Africa and endorsed the apartheid regime-- encouraging his flock to buy Kruggarands in order to offset sanctions against the regime. Falwell referred to Nobel laureate Bishop Desmond Tutu as a “phony.” (Note: during the 1960’s, Falwell used the Bible to justify the preservation of Jim Crow laws by arguing that blacks were stricken with the “Curse of Ham” and thus, it was God’s plan that they be submissive to white people).

    •In 1981, on the same day U.S. Civil Rights Commission issued its school desegregation report criticizing the Reagan administration, the White House announced that Chairman Arthur Flemming and Vice Chair Steven Horn would be replaced. In February of 1982, the White House announced that Reverend Sam Hart, a Black minister from Philadelphia, would replace Jill Ruckelshaus, a moderate Republican appointed to the commission by former President Carter. Hart was far more conservative than Ruckelshaus; he opposed both the ERA and busing and had characterized homosexuality as "an abomination both to God and mankind." After both Republican senators from Pennsylvania, John Heinz and Arlen Specter - neither of whom had been consulted about the nomination - expressed misgivings, Hart withdrew his name from consideration. In 1983, as a show to the South, Reagan fired three members of the the commission and replaced them with right-wing ideologues.

    A series of embarrassing episodes involved Commissioner William Allen during his 14-month tenure as chair in 1988 and 1989. Allen, a Reagan appointee, had been rebuked by the commission for an October 1989 speech titled "Blacks? Animals? Homosexuals? What Is a Minority?"

    • Reagan attempted to revoke the federal ban on tax exemptions for private schools that practiced racial discrimination.

    • Reagan used a stop at the Neshoba County Fair in his 1980 campaign to inject dog whistle politics aimed at unreconstructed Southern segregationists by the tactical use of code words like “states’ rights.”

    • In 1986, Reagan nominated Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III to be a judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Alabama. During the confirmation hearings, it was disclosed that Sessions had engaged in a pattern of behavior that was hostile to civil rights and racial equality. Sessions had referred to the ACLU and the NAACP as “communist-inspired” and un-American because they “forced civil rights down our throats.” Thomas Figues, a black Assistant U.S. Attorney testified that Sessions said he thought that the Ku Klux Klan was “okay until I found out they smoked pot.” Figures also testified that Sessions called him “boy” and testified that "Mr. Sessions admonished me to 'be careful what you say to white folks.'"

    Reagan appointee Marianne Mele Hall, who edited a book titled Foundations of Sand that berated blacks who supposedly “insist on preserving their jungle freedoms, their women, their avoidance of personal responsibility and their abhorrence of the work ethic.” The book was also critical of social scientists who “put blacks on welfare so they can continue their jungle freedoms of leisure time and subsidized procreation.”

    • Washington Times Check the other section on the paper's racial politics.

    • Human Events magazine. Check the other section on the journal's racial politics.

    • Reagan attempted to undermine the credibility and mission of the U.S. Civil rights Commission the commission was still suffering from the effects of a series of embarrassing episodes involving Commissioner William Allen during his 14-month tenure as chair in 1988 and 1989. (sic) Allen, a Reagan appointee, had been rebuked by the commission for an October 1989 speech titled "Blacks? Animals? Homosexuals? What Is a Minority?"

    • Reagan appointee Marianne Mele Hall, who edited a book titled Foundations of Sand that berated blacks who supposedly “insist on preserving their jungle freedoms, their women, their avoidance of personal responsibility and their abhorrence of the work ethic.” The book was also critical of social scientists who “put blacks on welfare so they can continue their jungle freedoms of leisure time and subsidized procreation.”

    • Reagan picked William Bradford Reynolds to be the associate attorney general for civil rights. Reynolds encouraged school districts to dismantle long-established desegregation programs. Reynolds refused to fulfill the mandates of his position—namely to enforce civil rights laws. He ignored court rulings that went against his hardline anti-civil rights agenda. Then-Republican Senator Arlen Specter accused Reynolds of giving misleading testimony, "disregarding the established law," and "elevating [his] own legal judgments over the judgments of the courts." His tenure was so controversial that even a Republican-led Senate Judiciary Committee defeated his 1985 nomination for promotion to associate attorney general.

    • Although Reagan was in the Party of Lincoln, that didn’t prevent him from heaping praise on Confederates such as president of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis, whom Reagan called, “a hero of mine.”

    • Reagan vetoed The Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1988 (Congress overrode the veto).

    • Reagan opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    • Reagan opposed the 1965 Voting Rights Act. He later called it "humiliating to the South" and as president, Reagan sought to weaken it.

    • Reagan opposed California Fair Housing Act. When campaigning for governor, Reagan told a crowd, "If an individual wants to discriminate against Negroes or others in selling or renting his house, it's his God-given right to do so."

    :rolleyes:... As a particularly ardent political commentator may say "Ohhhhh, my!" :p:D
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2015
  4. L'Emmerdeur

    L'Emmerdeur Upright Member

  5. IQless1
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    IQless1 trump supporters are scum

    It's possible, although highly unlikely, that the reason is because of my decision to publish this in "Chatter".

    Or, they simply wish to ignore it, as it doesn't fit into any of their arguments at this time.

    Thank you for the links. A quote or two:

    On Contra rebels:
    Reagan:
    Reagan didn't mind impeding the rights of the average Nicaraguan citizen (or U.S. citizens). They didn't matter to him. He wanted obeisance, the "right" of the U.S. to rule Central America.

    IMO.
     
  6. IQless1
    Blah

    IQless1 trump supporters are scum

    If they want, they can compare Reagan's dirty deeds to Carter, or Clinton, or Bush, or Jr., or Obama. They'd lie, of course, but those lies can be easily debunked. In some instances, they may even have a point...but one point out of a million does not make a convincing argument.
     
  7. IQless1
    Blah

    IQless1 trump supporters are scum

    The Pope is visiting the U.S.

    ....I wonder what he's going to say about unbridled capitalism. ;)
     

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